Tim May cypherpunks

Cypherpunk Tim May has reportedly died at his home in California. May was a co-founder of the Cypherpunk mailing list and author of The Crypto Anarchist Manifesto. His influence lay the groundwork for bitcoin, cryptocurrencies, and a new movement of privacy advocates.

Word of his death was announced by fellow cypherpunk Lucky Green: 

“My dear friend, co-conspirator in many things and for many years, fellow Freedom Fighter Tim May passed away earlier this week at his home in Corralitos, California… Tim May co-founded the Cypherpunks, perhaps the single most effective pro-cryptography grassroots organization in history.”

Founded in 1992, Tim May’s Cypherpunk mailing list was home to some of the most groundbreaking ideas in cryptographic and cryptocurrency history. Wei Dei shared his vision for a digital currency called b-money on the mailing list, many years before bitcoin was envisioned. Nick Szabo shared his concept for “smart contracts,” a decade before Ethereum came along to popularize the technology. And Adam Back outlined an early version of “proof of work,” which became the algorithm behind bitcoin.

The Cypherpunk mailing list was a melting pot of concepts and ideas that eventually came to the mainstream via Satoshi Nakamoto’s famous bitcoin whitepaper.

Without Tim May and the cypherpunk movement, there would be no bitcoin.

The Eerily Accurate Predictions of The Crypto Anarchist Manifesto

May’s lasting contribution to the world, however, is The Crypto Anarchist Manifesto. A short, passionate piece of writing published in 1988 that predicted the future with eerie accuracy. 

May outlined how computer technology would provide “the ability for individuals and groups to communicate and interact with each other in a totally anonymous manner.”

However, he explained how governments would react negatively to the movement. 

“The State will of course try to slow or halt the spread of this technology, citing national security concerns, use of the technology by drug dealers and tax evaders, and fears of societal disintegration.”

May even predicted how the technology would lead to an internet black market: 

“[Cryptography] will allow illicit and stolen materials to be traded. An anonymous computerized market will even make possible abhorrent markets for assassinations and extortion.”

The prediction is not a million miles away from the infamous Silk Road marketplace which harnessed bitcoin as a payment method.

But May was right in predicting that these events would not bring down the wider movement:

“This will not halt the spread of crypto anarchy.”

“Satoshi would barf”

As bitcoin infiltrated the mainstream, May became somewhat disillusioned with the trajectory. In his last published interview with CoinDesk, he lamented the direction of cryptocurrency:

“I can’t speak for what Satoshi intended, but I sure don’t think it involved bitcoin exchanges that have draconian rules about KYC, AML, passports, freezes on accounts and laws about reporting “suspicious activity” to the local secret police… I think Satoshi would barf.”

The Crypto Anarchist Manifesto, in Full

For those that are interested in Bitcoin and its history, take some time to read through The Crypto Anarchist Manifesto in full. This is how cryptocurrency took shape. It’s how the early pioneers envisioned the technology and what it could do. RIP, Tim May. 

The Crypto Anarchist Manifesto – Timothy C. May

A specter is haunting the modern world, the specter of crypto anarchy.

Computer technology is on the verge of providing the ability for individuals and groups to communicate and interact with each other in a totally anonymous manner. Two persons may exchange messages, conduct business, and negotiate electronic contracts without ever knowing the True Name, or legal identity, of the other. Interactions over networks will be untraceable, via extensive re- routing of encrypted packets and tamper-proof boxes which implement cryptographic protocols with nearly perfect assurance against any tampering. Reputations will be of central importance, far more important in dealings than even the credit ratings of today. These developments will alter completely the nature of government regulation, the ability to tax and control economic interactions, the ability to keep information secret, and will even alter the nature of trust and reputation.

The technology for this revolution–and it surely will be both a social and economic revolution–has existed in theory for the past decade. The methods are based upon public-key encryption, zero-knowledge interactive proof systems, and various software protocols for interaction, authentication, and verification. The focus has until now been on academic conferences in Europe and the U.S., conferences monitored closely by the National Security Agency. But only recently have computer networks and personal computers attained sufficient speed to make the ideas practically realizable. And the next ten years will bring enough additional speed to make the ideas economically feasible and essentially unstoppable. High-speed networks, ISDN, tamper-proof boxes, smart cards, satellites, Ku-band transmitters, multi-MIPS personal computers, and encryption chips now under development will be some of the enabling technologies.

The State will of course try to slow or halt the spread of this technology, citing national security concerns, use of the technology by drug dealers and tax evaders, and fears of societal disintegration. Many of these concerns will be valid; crypto anarchy will allow national secrets to be trade freely and will allow illicit and stolen materials to be traded. An anonymous computerized market will even make possible abhorrent markets for assassinations and extortion. Various criminal and foreign elements will be active users of CryptoNet. But this will not halt the spread of crypto anarchy.

Just as the technology of printing altered and reduced the power of medieval guilds and the social power structure, so too will cryptologic methods fundamentally alter the nature of corporations and of government interference in economic transactions. Combined with emerging information markets, crypto anarchy will create a liquid market for any and all material which can be put into words and pictures. And just as a seemingly minor invention like barbed wire made possible the fencing-off of vast ranches and farms, thus altering forever the concepts of land and property rights in the frontier West, so too will the seemingly minor discovery out of an arcane branch of mathematics come to be the wire clippers which dismantle the barbed wire around intellectual property.

Arise, you have nothing to lose but your barbed wire fences!

bitcoin hacks

$927 million worth of cryptocurrency was stolen in 2018 according to a new report by CipherTrace.  The vast majority of this money was taken from cryptocurrency exchanges in high-profile hacks.

Block Explorer decided to review the biggest crypto hacks of 2018 to remind our readers about the importance of taking all the possible measures to keep their digital fortunes safe. Meet the notorious winners:

January: Coincheck ($532.6 Million Hack)

This year started with one of the biggest crypto heists ever. Around 500 million XEM coins (native cryptocurrency of the NEM project) were stolen from the hot wallet of Tokyo-based crypto exchange Coincheck. 

At the date of the incident, the coins were worth roughly $532.6 million, beating the well-known disastrous Mt. Gox hack, when 850,000 of Bitcoins disappeared. The damage at the time was around $450 million.

Coincheck’s misadventures led to its acquisition by Monex Inc., a Japanese financial services group in April 2018. Monex was interested to increase the company’s international outreach.

It took ten months for the dust to settle, but Coincheck has now resumed its trading services.

February: BitGrail ($170 Million Hack)

Another month, another hack. This time the bad luck happened to BitGrail, a small Italian crypto exchange. And even though its trading volumes were not impressive, it was a perfect place for trading Nano (XRB). The asset went from $0.1 back in November 2017 to as high as $34 in January 2018 and was trading around $9-$18 at the moment of the hack. Its volatility made it very attractive for speculative traders, and the prospect of potential gains made them blind to the risk of using the non-mainstream exchange. 

And so it happened: BitGrail reported that hackers get away with 17 million nano, worth around $170 million at the time of the incident. Francesco Firano, known as @bomberfrancy on Twitter, the man behind the exchange, tried to put the blame on the Nano developers and claiming that they didn’t want to collaborate.

Firano offered the project’s team a solution for recovery after the hack: to modify the ledger. But the answer was negative. 

This story quickly became more and more controversial due to the endless discussions and theories suggested by social media users. They included the hypothesis that the nano hack was an exit scam.   

April: Ian Balina ($2 Million Hack on YouTube Live Stream)

Ian Balina, quite an established crypto influencer, investor and advisor, was hacked during his live stream ironically named “Hacking the System”. Approximately $2 million worth of tokens were snatched during this attack. Some participants of the crypto sphere speculated that it was a foxy trick to avoid taxes. 

Later in September, two young men, Fletcher Robert Childers, 23 and Joseph Harris, 21 (believed to go by the alias ‘Doc’), were arrested on suspicion of carrying out the attack. As reported by Motherboard, Balina confirmed he thought persons named Doc and Veri were behind the hack. 

June: Coinrail ($40 Million Hack)

June started with some noise in South Korea when a tiny exchange Coinrail lost more than $40 million worth of crypto in yet another hack. The biggest hit was taken by payment processing startup called Pundi X, with around 3% of total NPXS token supply affected. 

The project’s team was very eager to cooperate by freezing the stolen tokens immediately and halting trading to help with the investigation.

To this date, there are no major announcements on identifying the criminal behind the Coinrail’s heist. 

June: Bithumb ($31 Million Hack)

Bithumb is one of the most popular crypto exchanges in South Korea; one of the top ten in the world by volume for trading bitcoin cash and ethereum at the time of the hack. 

In spite of being a mainstream exchange, Bithumb was the subject of a hack in June 2018. During the attack, approximately 35 billion of Korean won worth of crypto was stolen ($31 million equivalent).  

According to some reports, the exchange’s management was aware of security issues prior to the breach and took measures to enhance the exchange’s safety, but it still didn’t work out. 

After the hack was discovered, the exchange’s management made a pledge to refund the losses to all affected customers from its own reserves. 

The investigation of the event was held by South Korea’s National Police Agency and its cybersecurity division. However, at the moment of writing, no definite suspects were found. 

September: Zaif ($60 Million Hack)

Another Japanese exchange came under attack. Hackers accessed the exchange’s hot wallets, which resulted in the loss of $60 million worth of crypto assets, including monacoin, bitcoin cash, and bitcoin.

The owner of the exchange, Tech Bureau Corp., promised to cover the losses of all affected customer and to do so got into a deal with Fisco Ltd. They agreed to exchange the major stake of Zaif exchange for financial support to resolve the issue. The total amount received was 5 billion yen (approximately $45 million). 

October: MapleChange (Unknown Figures)

Later in October, MapleChange, a tiny Canadian crypto exchange reported a hack, losing practically all the funds the exchange had at their disposal. The announcement was followed by the company’s management shutting down its website and social media accounts. They deleted everything that might have led to identifying the owner’s names. Many of MapleChange’s customers were not buying the “hack” story and suspected that it was a scam exit. 

October: Trade.io ($8 million Hack)

Another crypto exchange was hacked in October. Swiss-based Trade.io reported the loss of about $8 million worth of TIO tokens, apparently stolen from a company’s cold wallet. 

The stolen tokens were intended to be used as a project’s liquidity pool. Therefore, the management performed a fork to get the funds back. 

Interestingly enough the team stored the wallet itself in a local bank’s deposit safe. And since it was reported that the safe wasn’t compromised the only explanation is that hackers somehow managed to access the wallet details for making the transfers, that normally indicates an “inside job”. 

SIM Swap Hacks Turn Mainstream. Millions of Dollars Lost

 Towards the end of the year, we saw a new trend emerge: sim swap hacks.

By November these got completely out of hand and became a real pain for the members of the crypto community. 

In the nutshell, the SIM swap method gives the criminal the access to someone’s crypto wallets. By using SMS backup it’s possible to bypass two-factor authentication commonly used to protect the digital fortunes. 

Among the possible scenarios of a perfect SIM swap heist are: 

  • Bribing the mobile operator’s employees to get some inside help with the crime
  • Intentional abuse of customers’ data by former or current employees
  • Employees tricking innocent colleagues to swap the potential target’s SIM cards. 

As for the victims… Robert Ross, an angel investor from San Francisco, lost around $1 million due to the SIM swap. Christian Ferri, the head of BlockStar lost over $100,000. Michael Terpin, a well-known veteran of crypto space, is suing AT&T over a SIM swap that cost Terpin around $23.8 million at the time. And that’s just to name a few.

The list is living proof that with the evolution of blockchain-based projects comes the increased level of sophistication and persistence of crypto criminals. Don’t let them get you and be safe! 

Please don’t keep your crypto on an exchange

It might be simple and convenient, but it is not safe. Instead, move your funds to a secure wallet of your own where it is less vulnerable to hacks.

Essential further reading: 12 Best Bitcoin Wallets (For Safe and Secure Crypto Storage in 2018)

 

Mining crypto currency. Farm for mining bitcoins. Vector flat illustration
  • Proof of Work is the algorithm that powers various blockchains, like Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin, and Monero.
  • Miners solve complex mathematical puzzles using computer power to produce a “block” of transactions.
  • When a block is produced, the miner is rewarded with the native cryptocurrency: bitcoin, ether, or litecoin, for example.
  • Proof of work ensures that blocks are produced at a stable rate and are accurately verified.

Cryptocurrencies work on the principle of a blockchain, where blocks containing transactions are added to the chain to make transactions happen. 

The issue is, the speed and validity of blocks must be kept in check. Proof of Work solves this issue, let’s check out how.

The Problem

Blocks on the blockchain are quite powerful as they confirm the transaction of money between addresses. They also distribute new currency by issuing rewards to the block creator. 

For these reasons, there are two important rules for block production.

  • Blocks need to be verified some way, so that we know what order transactions happened, among other things.
  • We need to control the speed at which blocks are added. If the speed is not controlled, block rewards are added to the network quickly and the worth of the currency plummets.

Bitcoin, for example, has a target block time of ten minutes. If blocks are created too fast, too much bitcoin will be given out to miners, thus flooding the market. Something has to keep that block time regulated.

Enter Proof Of Work

Proof of work solves both of our issues. It’s based on the idea that we include some data in the block that is hard to calculate, but easy to verify. 

In most proof of work cryptocurrencies, this comes in the form of a cryptographic hash.

What is a Hash Function?

A hash function takes a message or piece of data and scrambles it into a long cryptographic, alphanumeric code. 

But the smallest change to the message or data creates huge changes in the code. 

For example:

The SHA1 hash of “Armin Davis” is: 397d23a20e7cf5065238d7cdda5430d62a68445b

But change the capital letters to lower-case…

The SHA1 hash of “armin davis” is: b1371918c95f4693273757a2bc51514dcdfd1697

The hashes are completely different and seemingly random.

But it’s not random. The same input data will always return the same hash. Meaning that we can easily verify that a given hash is right for a given block easily. 

And, if we include the hash of the previous block in ours, we can prove order too.

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proof of work
Proof of work compared against alternative algorithm “proof of stake” Credit: CryptoTechies

What About the Timing Issue?

Hash algorithms are perfect for our verification problem but don’t fix the issue of timing on their own. 

Hashes are designed to be fast to compute, very fast in fact. The time it took to calculate the above two hashes was less than one-hundredth of a second.

But we need to regulate the time, so blocks aren’t produced too quickly.

We have a simple solution to this: network difficulty. 

Simply put, you can change how long it takes to create a block by making it harder to solve the cryptographic puzzle.

bitcoin difficulty chart
As more and more miners devote hash power to the Bitcoin network, the “difficulty” has increased dramatically to keep block production in check. Source: Bitinfocharts

Usually, that means including a constraint that the hash must be below a specific number. And that that number is calculated at specific intervals. 

Now miners have to hash their blocks many times, with each one taking up some time and lots of computer power. In order for the block creator to change the hash of their block, an additional bit of information is added to the block called the nonce. 

A nonce is simply a number that can be modified as the block creator sees fit to change the output hash.

Each time a hash is calculated and does not meet the requirements of the network at that time, the nonce is incremented or otherwise changed and the hash re-calculated.

Often a miner will try a very large number of different nonces before they find one that will be accepted by the network. The total time all miners take to find a block should be somewhere around the block time (ten minutes for Bitcoin). 

And if not, the difficulty is adjusted to keep the timing in line.

Not all Proof of Work Algorithms are the Same…

The hashing algorithm a cryptocurrency uses directly affects how difficulty will work, and what hardware you can run the mining software on. 

To use Bitcoin as an example again; Bitcoin uses the algorithm SHA-256, which is an industry standard hashing algorithm used in many places. 

If you’ve saved a password on a website, odds are it was hashed with Secure Hash Algorithm (SHA)-256 before it was stored. Using industry standard hashing algorithms means they are proven secure and worked on by massive communities.

However, using industry-standard algorithms is both a blessing and a curse. 

A blessing because most hardware will be able to run your software. But a curse (depending on how you look at it) due to one word: ASICs.

ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuits) are mining hardware that gives your network a massive amount of mining power. That increases centralization due to price and power demands. The more ASICs you own or control, the more of the network you command.

Some other cryptocurrencies, like Monero, use their own hashing algorithm specifically designed for use in proof of work systems. These have the advantage that developers have complete control over what hardware the algorithm works on best.

Downsides to Proof of Work

There are a few downsides to Proof of Work when compared to other solutions.

First, Proof of Work requires a lot of computing power. And, the more mining power on the network, the higher the difficulty. Meaning that you very quickly run into a situation where those with the cash to buy hardware do. And when you have a lot of hardware, you tend to store all their hardware in one place, leading to centralization.

At worst, this could lead to a 51% attack, whereby one actor, or group of actors, control more than half of the network. If that happens, they could theoretically “double spend” the cryptocurrency on the network.

And second, that computing power needs a lot of electricity to run, and at the high end, miners go looking for the cheapest power possible. This means that miners start to congregate in cities or countries where the power is cheap, again leading to centralization.

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who to follow in crypto?

Edit: This list of crypto experts was updated on January 11th to reflect the industry in 2019.

So-called crypto experts are everywhere in the blockchain world. But it’s not always easy to spot the true influencers from the wannabes.

We crawled dozens of “cryptocurrency experts” lists and hundreds of self-proclaimed crypto gurus’ Twitter profiles to distill the data into Block Explorer’s own definitive list of blockchain experts to follow. 

Some are well-known figures shaping the future of the industry. Others are low-key insiders that truly have an immense value to share. So here it goes, the 23 crypto experts you have to follow on Twitter: 

#1 Vitalik Buterin (@vitalikbuterin)

Who? Genius Canadian programmer of Russian origin, creator of Ethereum and co-founder of Bitcoin Magazine. 

Why follow? He’s at the heart of Ethereum’s cutting-edge development, knows the industry’s nitty-gritty and he’s funny, in a dry, sarcastic kind of way. 

What does he say?

#2 Charlie Lee (@SatoshiLite)

Who? The creator of Litecoin. Former director of engineering at Coinbase. Managing director of the Litecoin Foundation.

Why follow? Shares great and easy-to-comprehend bits of information explaining the beauty of blockchain technology to non-tech-savvy blockchain enthusiasts. Also, he is very social and spends time with the most important people in the industry, so you get to know all the experts.

What does he say? 

#3 Jed McCaleb (@JedMcCaleb)

Who? The creator of Mt. Gox (though he left before it was hacked and went bankrupt) and one of the founders of Ripple. Currently developer at Stellar and co-founder of Stellar Development Foundation. Fascinated by octopuses.

Why follow? One of the brightest developers in the field. Tweets are rare but feature the important updates from Stellar on the way to crypto’s mass adoption. 

What does he say?

 

#4 Roger Ver (@rogerkver)

Who? Among the world’s first investors in Bitcoin startups including Bitcoin.com, Blockchain.com, Zcash, BitPay, Kraken, Purse.io. Bitcoin Cash advocate. 

Why follow? Interested in some popcorn-worthy debates, involving the sharpest minds in the industry? Then enjoy the regular performances in the comment section for some of Ver’s tweets, in a vivid manner explaining why Bitcoin Cash is far way better than Bitcoin. 

What does he say?

#5 Tuur Demeester (@tuurdemeester)

Who? Investor, fintech analyst, the founder of bitcoin fund called Adamant Capital.

Why follow? Shares some great perspectives on trading crypto (and securities) with lots of relevant data and research from authoritative sources.

What does he say?

#6 Andreas M.Antonopoulos (@aantonop)

Who? Entrepreneur, coder, atheist, pacifist, pilot. Author of: Mastering Bitcoin, The Internet of Money, Mastering Ethereum.

Why follow? For all the people out there who are still struggling to understand what bitcoin is and how blockchain works, Andreas is the go-to guy for perfectly clear explanations. His latest book ships at the end of the year. 

What does he say? 

#7 Nick Szabo (@nickszabo4)

Who? Blockchain, cryptocurrency, and smart contracts pioneer (and possible Bitcoin creator?!)

Why follow? Shares some profound thoughts on the blockchain and its potential place and role in the current political, social, and financial systems. On top of that, from time to time, adds some technical insights for those who want to understand the concepts of the blockchain and smart contracts deeper.

What does he say? 

#8 Gavin Andresen (@gavinandresen)

Who? Bitcoin developer, the founder of Bitcoin Foundation. 

Why follow? His tweets are appealing both for crypto traders and developers. Gavin is also witty. 

What does he say? 

#9 Barry Silbert (@barrysilbert)

Who? Founder at Digital Currency Group, “parent” of Grayscale Investments’ Bitcoin and Ethereum trusts and CoinDesk. Also, he’s an investor in more than 100 different cryptocurrencies.

Why follow? Barry’s vast involvement in the field gives him a notable edge on knowing which news to follow and which new cryptocurrencies are worth taking a more in-depth look.

What does he say?

#10 Nicolas Cary (@niccary)

Who? Founder of Blockchain wallet, the chairman and co-founder of Youth Business USA.

Why follow? One of the first people in the industry who actually built a working product (with 29+ million wallets created at the moment of writing this article) and who continues its development. 

What does he say?

#11 Emin Gün Sirer (@el33th4xor) 

Who? Hacker and the professor of computer science at Cornell University.

Why follow? Shares some non-trivial and easy-to-digest ideas that can be appreciated by academics and non-technical audiences alike. If you’re striving to learn more about blockchain and dig into some real questions that the industry still has to solve, he’s worth a follow.

What does he say?  

#12 Adam Back (@adam3us)

Who? Cryptographer, inventor of Hashcash, the proof of work algorithm used in bitcoin mining, co-founder of Blockstream.

Why follow? Perfect if you want to follow the latest developments in blockchain (from the tech perspective).

What does he say? 

#13. Meltem Demirors (@Melt_Dem)

Who: According to her Twitter profile, Demirors teaches at The Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Oxford University. She has a prominent corporate background as an analyst at Dow Chemical and Tradax Energy and as a consultant at Deloitte.

Starting from 2015 she was deeply involved in Digital Currency Group, one of the most active investors in the industry (its portfolio counts over 100 companies). Currently, she is chief strategy officer at investment management company, CoinShares. So she really knows her stuff.

Why follow: Meltem has a UNIQUE point of view on what’s going on in the industry right now and where it might take us soon on the macroeconomic level. And she doesn’t hesitate to share it.

What does she say?

#14 Brock Pierce (@brockpierce)

Who? Chairman of Bitcoin Foundation, involved in a long list of projects including (Re)start, ONE, Blockchain Capital, EOS, DNA, Tether, Mastercoin. 

Why follow? As his own Twitter profile states, Brock is “working to positively impact the lives of billions of people.” A controversial figure, but definitely worth a follow.

What does he say? 

#15 Ari Paul (@AriDavidPaul)

Who? Co-founder of BlockTower Capital. 

Why follow? An expert with in-depth knowledge of blockchain and cryptocurrencies, putting the tech in the perspective of markers, mass-adoption, and regulations. At the moment of writing, Ari decided to take a break from Twitter, but we really hope he’ll be back soon with more insights.  

What does he say?

#16 Jimmy Song (@jimmysong)

Who? Bitcoin educator, developer, and entrepreneur.

Why follow? One of a few people who truly understands the insides of a blockchain and at the same time clearly (and sometimes with a hint of a perfect sense of humor) articulate it to a broader audience.

What does he say?  

#17 Peter Todd (@peterktodd)

Who? Applied cryptography (also called blockchain by some cool kids) consultant.

Why follow? He is sarcastic and geeky, his tweets are right to the point, and he is passionate about tackling some of crypto’s underlying problems like scaling and privacy. 

What does he say?

 

#18 Eric Voorhees (@ErikVoorhees)

Who? Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of ShapeShift.

Why follow? One of the oldest players in the industry. Shares the most important news and developments in the field of the blockchain that step-by-step lead to crypto assets becoming mainstream. 

What does he say?

#19 Laura Shin (@laurashin)

Who? Forbes editor and host of two crypto podcasts, Unchained and Unconfirmed.

Why follow? She has interviewed and grilled most of the names on this list, asking them tough questions and removing the hype from blockchain. Just listen to her podcast with Binance founder CZ.

What does she say?

 

#20 Tone Vays (@ToneVays) 

 Who? Derivatives trader, analyst, and blockchain content creator, including the podcast called CryptoScam.

Why follow? For many years Tone worked on Wall Street and even became vice president at JP Morgan Chase after the 2008 financial crisis. The expertise he acquired in the institutional world and his passion for cryptocurrencies are definitely making him a viable candidate for any “best crypto experts to follow” list.  

What does he say? 

#21 Naval Ravikant (@naval)

Who? Co-founder of AngelList. And, as one of the founders on a project Naval advised put it, “he’s the f*cking man.”

Why follow? A person who knows all the nuts and bolts of entrepreneurship. Naval’s tweets are a combination of philosophy, practicality, and inspiration. He also intervolves Bitcoin in this ravel of awesomeness.  

What does he say?

#22 Nathaniel Popper (@nathanielpopper)

Who? The New York Times journalist, reporting about technology and finance, the author of Digital Gold, the most exciting history of Bitcoin.

Why follow? Nathaniel writes the most interesting, in-depth, and entertaining stories about the industry. No kidding. 

What does he say?

#23 Jameson Lopp (@lopp)

Who? Professional cypherpunk, creator of Statoshi.info, infrastructure engineer at Casa.

Why follow? Along with techy mambo-jumbo that many of the people involved in crypto will appreciate, Jameson spreads profound knowledge, aimed at a broader audience. Anything from funny comics, curious thoughts and eye-opening metaphors will do in the second case.

What does he say?

#24 Changpeng Zhao (@cz_binance)

Who? Founder of Binance, the largest bitcoin exchange in the world by volume.

Why follow? Insight into what’s going on at the world’s biggest crypto exchange (and the occasional funny tweets towards Elon Musk!)

What does he say?

Do you think we left someone behind? Go ahead and share your favorite crypto expert in the comment section below.

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