Crypto Layoffs Continue. Here’s What We Know So Far (ShapeShift, ConsenSys, Bitmain)

Edit: This list of crypto layoffs was updated on January 14th to include the latest restructures.

Crypto Winter has hit hard. The sharp downturn in cryptocurrency prices has forced blockchain companies to take drastic measures to ensure their sustainability. Late in 2018, crypto startups began to announce layoffs and restructures, including some of the biggest names in blockchain. Here’s what we know so far:

ShapeShift (third of staff)

Crypto exchange ShapeShift is the latest to announce layoffs which will hit 37 employees – a third of its staff.

In a passionate and honest Medium post, CEO Erik Voorhees said: “It’s a deep and painful reduction, mirrored across many crypto companies in this latest bear market cycle.”

Like many blockchain companies, ShapeShift’s balance sheet is comprised of cryptocurrencies, leaving them significantly exposed during the downturn. After rapid growth of 3,000% in 2017, ShapeShift expanded to include market tracker coincap.io and hardware wallet KeepKey. Voorhees cites a lack of focus on the recent decision to downsize: “they were pulling our attention in too many directions.”

Voorhees ended his statement with an apology to his former employees: “I am sorry this happened. Your confusion, your sadness, your anger… all of it is understandable, and I am sorry to put you through it. Your contributions — of effort, of personality, of experience — remain part of our fabric.”

ConsenSys (up to 60% of staff)

ConsenSys is a startup incubator for Ethereum projects. CEO Joseph Lubin was a co-founder of Ethereum and since moved on to foster Ethereum startups.

However, ConsenSys is now re-evaluating its future. Initial reports emerged in December that ConsenSys would lay off 13% of staff. However, further rumors point to a much larger restructure involving the layoffs of 50-60% of its workforce.

In a statement, Lubin said: “Our first step in this direction has been a difficult one: we are streamlining several parts of the business including ConsenSys Solutions, spokes, and hub services, leading to a 13% reduction of mesh members.”

In its bid to fund the next generation of Ethereum projects, ConsenSys reported burn rate was $100 million.

Bitmain (up to half of all staff)

Bitmain is the biggest name in cryptocurrency mining. The company has even filed an initial public offering (IPO) to list itself on the Hong Kong stock exchange.

However, crypto winter has hit Bitmain hard. It closed its research and development arm in Israel late last year. Rumors then began to circulate that half of all staff were at risk.

The rumors spread to social media network MaiMai (China’s version of LinkedIn) to which a verified Bitmain employee wrote: “It’s affirmative. The layoff will start next week and involves more than 50 percent of the entire Bitmain’s headcount.”

The layoffs are reportedly in Bitmain’s non-core departments such as artificial intelligence.

Steemit (70% of staff)

Steemit is a blockchain-based social media and blogging platform. Similar to Medium, but contributors are paid in cryptocurrency for their writing.

The platform laid off 70% of staff in 2018. Founder and CEO Ned Scott cited “the weakness of the cryptocurrency market, the fiat returns on our automated selling of STEEM diminishing, and the growing costs of running full Steem nodes” for the decision.

He also explained the need for sharp focus on the core product before expanding: “In order to ensure that we can continue to improve Steem, we need to first get costs under control to remain economically sustainable.”

Kraken (57 staff members)

Kraken is one of the oldest and largest cryptocurrency exchanges. It’s also considered one of the most secure. However, the exchange is not immune to falling prices and lower volume on its platform.

The company cut 57 staff members from its Halifax office in Canada in 2018. However, the company maintains it is still “aggressively hiring” in many areas of the business.

Huobi (exact figures not disclosed)

Another of the world’s largest cryptocurrency exchanges, Huobi, released a vague statement about “optimizing” its staff. Although exact figures have not been disclosed, this is widely assumed to mean broad layoffs and restructure at the company.

Coinfloor (most of its 40 employees)

London-based Coinfloor is the oldest crypto exchange in the UK. It reportedly cut most of its 40 staff members in October 2018 in response to low volume. 

CEO Obi Nwosu said “We are currently working on a business restructure to ensure that we focus on our competitive advantages in the marketplace… As part of this restructure, we are making some staff changes and redundancies.”

Spankchain (more than 50% staff)

Spankchain ran a successful ICO, launching a coin to fund an adult entertainment platform. But when the coin’s market cap dropped from $190 million to just $6 million, the company was forced to rethink. It cut its employee and freelancer base from 20 to 8. 

Blockfolio

Blockfolio, a crypto portfolio tracker, has cut staff from 41 to 37 in an effort to restructure the company. Despite a recent $11.5 million injection of funding, Blockfolio has refocused its operations, putting an affiliated venture called Datablock on the backburner.

340 UK Blockchain Companies Shut Their Doors

Sky News in the UK scoured the Companies House and Open Corporates database and discovered that 340 blockchain or cryptocurrency companies in the UK closed down in 2018.

The harsh market conditions are forcing companies in the space to rethink their strategies, refocus, and concentrate on their core business. Let’s hope we see fewer headlines like this in 2019.

Ben Brown

Editor, Block Explorer News

One Reply to “Crypto Layoffs Continue. Here’s What We Know So Far (ShapeShift, ConsenSys, Bitmain)”

  1. Netki isn’t a crypto firm persay but services ICOs and they let their staff go last month. Couple dozen. The ICO market has evaporated.

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