Every Friday, we take a light-hearted tour through the best memes, artwork, and oddities from the cryptoverse.  This week, Carty Sewill makes us all feel old with the “30-year-old boomer who traded crypto.”

“That 30-year-old boomer who trades crypto.” That sentence, and the viral meme that followed, made me feel like an old man talking about gold and silver every time I mentioned bitcoin. No meme has ever made me feel more self-conscious than the ’30-year-old boomer’.

crypto booomer
Figure 1. The 30-Year-Old Boomer

For those of you who don’t know a boomer, or baby boomer, is someone born between 1945 and 1965. Whether it be relatives or the old man at work listening to Sean Hannity, we all know a few. The arch-nemesis of millennials, boomers are owners of muscle cars and deniers of climate change. Boomers are the target audience of gold and silver shills alike. Much like millennials love crypto, boomers love their shiny rocks.

That’s the crux of the meme. We crypto-loving millennials are slowly finding ourselves out of touch. Relegated to the status of ‘old dude’ on 4Chan and Reddit. Especially considering the current downturn. Much like a boomer talking rocks, it seems talking cryptocurrency has become its own cliche. Imbued with the same stereotypes underlying millennials dislike of boomers: drinking Coors Light, driving muscle cars, listening to Rush, and mowing lawns; to name a few.

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Figure 2. The 30-Year-Old Boomer Washing His Challenger Enjoying a Monster.

First appearing on 4Chan channel /biz/ at the end of April in 2018, the 30-year-old boomer was met with disdain and copious amounts of coping. Posted with the sentence, “that 30-year-old boomer who trades crypto,” and a new balding wojak, the meme struck a chord. In no time, parodies where being drawn and memers began playing with their new toy.

Though posted first on /biz/ in reference to cryptocurrency, this meme in particular found itself in all corner of the internet rather quickly. Soon posted to 4Chan channel /v/ after its 2018 debut, almost immediately Facebook groups were created and in no time the internet echoed with the insult ‘boomer.’ Threads extolling the virtues of crypto exchange-traded funds (ETFs) were met with derogatory images of a balding wojak.

Like magic, the meme began pigeonholing me and all of my friends. This meme literally kept me off /biz/ for days. Protecting myself from the anxious cringe that was the 30-year-old boomer meme hitting the proverbial nail on my head. As the wojak began being portrayed smoking, drinking Monster energy drinks, driving Challengers, all the while talking Bitcoin and wearing Led Zeppelin tees. Like any good crypto-meme it was picked up and played out by Bizonacci, but the boomer meme reached its zenith with a post by Rick Steubens. Who, on this occasion, took meme videos to a whole new level.

Figure 4. Rick Steubens 30 Year Old Boomer Tribute Animation.

The meme still has legs but its slow dissipation from popular internet platforms has been, for me personally, a breath of fresh air. Because in the end, the boomer meme speaks to the hard truth that no matter how cool or new we think crypto is, it’s getting older. And the older bitcoin gets the more ‘uncool’ it becomes. I’m not looking for any reminders.

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Crypto bart pattern

Every Friday, we take a light-hearted tour through the best memes, artwork, and oddities from the cryptoverse. After another sudden drop in the market, Carty Sewill explorers a meme that pops up all over trading charts: The Bart Pattern.

If you’re like me, staring at the BitMEX chart at 1:00 am on a Thursday, you probably knew it was coming. A classic setup and typical execution. A big green stick followed by a red one a day or even a few hours later. Some of you know it as a ‘pump and dump,’ but veteran traders know it by its true name “The Bart Pattern.” A meme so literal, named after the top of Bart Simpson’s head, it’s uncanny. 

crypto meme bart pattern
Figure 1. The Classic Bart Pattern.

But that’s what happens when everyone’s leveraged and the whales decide to have some fun. Profiting while the rest of us “have a cow, man.” It’s no secret. And, furthermore, it’s no surprise so many in the BitMEX trollbox claim to trade based on ‘Bart Pattern Analysis.’ Longing Inverse Bart patterns and shorting the classic Bart. A sort of meta Technical Analysis if you will.

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Figure 2. Classic Double-Bart Reversal. (An inverse Bart followed by a Classic Bart.)

It’s hard to pin down exactly when the Bart pattern appeared as a Technical Analysis meme in the crypto-sphere but if I was to hazard to guess, its origins lie somewhere deep in the BitMEX trollbox sometime around the end of February 2018. As Bitcoin began to settle under $10K. When the action slowed, the manipulation flowed, and the whales were forced to keep themselves entertained.

Soon, Barts began appearing on 4chan’s /biz/; as with any good crypto-meme. Some decrying latent manipulation while others boasting of their TA prowess in identifying an ‘obvious Bart.’ All with an image of the same lovable, menacing, iconic yellow-faced dude’s hair sitting under the Bitcoin chart. In no time, Bizonacci was making light and posting videos. Even going so far as identifying ‘Marges’ and ‘Lisas’ on the 1m chart. 

Today it’s a regular sight and topic of discussion on TradingView. And not without merit. Veteran and newbie traders alike yielded to the power of the Bart pattern. Bears and bulls both living in fear of the instant liquidation of the first and last stick while smart traders set stop losses and call for Bart Simpson to make a cameo.

bart pattern tradingview
Figure 4. The Bart Pattern being discussed on TradingView.

I’ve even tried to play a few myself. Though, with little success. But like many before me I’ll keep taking my chances and, hopefully, one day call a Bart like a boss. 

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bitconnect carlos matos

Over the past few weeks of ‘Meme History’ we’ve covered the basics; Sminem, the Wojaks, and Bobo the Bear. But in all the commotion, the lowest hanging fruit has yet to be plucked. What is probably the most well-known and mainstream of crypto-meme stories has yet to be told. And how poignant the story is in this, seemingly, never-ending bear market. The story of Carlos Matos or Bitconnect Carlos.

Figure 1. The Original Bitconnect conference video featuring Carlos Matos

Now defunct, Bitconnect was a cryptocurrency lending platform that operated like a pyramid or “Ponzi” scheme. Launched in December of 2016, the Bitconnect platform asked users to convert their bitcoin into Bitconnect coins and lend those coins out to other users. The lenders were rewarded with interest; the more you lent, the more interest you accrued. Bitconnect’s anonymous lending platform had people crying Ponzi from the start. It duped many bitcoin holders and in the process became crypto’s most iconic fraud. Carlos Matos was its most iconic sucker.

BitConnect-logo
Figure 2: the Bitconnect logo

During the bull market that was Q4 of 2017, coins needed little merit to see a jump in price and early Bitconnect adopters like Carlos Matos were raking in the coins. His success on the platform led to his attending of an October symposium and appreciation ceremony in Thailand.  During the event, Carlos made and ill-fatedly enthusiastic attempt at shilling Bitconnect. A coin many in the crypto-community recognized as a fraud. And ended like everyone expected.

carlos-bitconnect
Figure 3. Carlos Matos attending Bitconnect’s conference.

Screaming “Bitcooooonect!!,” and “Wassup!” like a 1990’s beer frog, Carlos’ presentation struck a chord with the crypto-community and we all lol’d together for weeks. In no time, parodies started hitting YouTube, and Bitconnect became as close to a household name as any shitcoin has ever gotten. It even got as far as PewDiePie. 

Figure 4. Pewdiepie’s Bitconnect video.

It’s probably the most ‘mainstream’ crypto meme out there. With good reason. Carlos is the embodiment of the dupe and everyone loves a dupe. Especially when you’re missing out on the bull run that was 2017. 

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Every Friday, we take a light-hearted tour through the best memes, artwork, and oddities from the cryptoverse.  This week, Carty Sewill explores the Pink Wojak’s cousin, the Green Wojak.

We could all use a little optimism. There hasn’t been much of it over the past few months; that’s for sure. But in that time we’ve seen a pump or two and felt the warm glow of hope. A reminder of past highs and profitable longs. It’s been quite some time since bullish crypto memes graced the front page of Reddit and flooded Crypto-Twitter. But they’re out there. Waiting. One such meme is the Pink Wojak’s cousin the Green Wojak.

Green Wojak
The Green Wojak

Whereas the Pink Wojak is a symbol of despair, regret, and desperation, the Green Wojak is the antithesis. A calm, collected ‘hodler,’ the Green Wojak is the image of an optimistic and profitable ‘bullish’ investor. Always exiting the rollercoaster at the top and buying the bottom.

Though our Green Wojak might share the same origin story as his evil twin, his emergence in early 2017 was a time of optimism and hope for the crypto market. Bitcoin maximalists seemed to have won out and everyone looked to be reaping the benefits. A hard fork of “Feels Guys,” the Green Wojak started seeing the light of day in early 2017 as altcoins began to rally behind bitcoin. The original post seems to be lost out there somewhere so the specific time and date are a bit ambiguous.

original wojak
The original Wojak or “Feels Guy.”

But its place of birth is the same as, seemingly, any great crypto meme. It was originally posted on 4Chan channel,  /biz/. With the kind of placid comfort and profitability only a mediocre MS Paint sketch can imbue, it seems /biz/ has become the center of the crypto-meme-verse. And for good reason.

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Green Wojaks on 4Chan /biz/

The Green Wojak is just one in a long line of iconic crypto-memes flowing out of the crypto-trollbox. And like the others, he’s become the focus of Bizonacci videos, countless spinoffs and mashups, and an endless stream of content focused on everyday price movements in our favorite market; crypto.

green and pink wojak
A green and pink Wojak mashup

Here’s hoping we see more of /biz/’s Green Wojak in the near future. I saw a few just last week. Though the bullish sentiment that came with them seems to have faded now. He will return soon. That’s for certain.

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Every Friday, we take a light-hearted tour through the best memes, artwork, and oddities from the cryptoverse. In a year when $1 billion crypto was stolen, Carty Sewill explorers a meme devoted to crypto hacks: “Funds are Safu.”

We’ve all felt it. The overwhelming anxiety that comes when you log into an exchange and see any change in balance or lack of withdrawal options. It instantly triggers thoughts of GOX. Whether it’s a hack, a server error, or just maintenance, we’re a shaky bunch; with good reason. Sometimes we need assurances. We want to know our ‘Funds are safu.’

CZ Binance funds are safu

Everyone knows they shouldn’t keep coins they’re not willing to lose sitting on an exchange. But sometimes it’s not so simple. Withdrawal and transaction fees, for some of us, can nickel and dime our portfolios out of existence. Others trade too frequently to be moving coins back and forth all day. Unless you plan on quitting your job.

The majority of us have a few exchanges we trust and most of us use one of those exchanges like a wallet. Binance being one such exchange for many a crypto-enthusiast. And in early March of 2018 the collective PTSD of the crypto-community was triggered once again when an API and SYScoin attack caused a disruption of balances and the temporary shutdown on Binance.

In a clever scheme, a hacker used Binance APIs to target a low liquidity coin, SYScoin, in order to manipulate the order book and use access to a high volume account to withdraw Bitcoin without an audit. The hack triggered an immediate shutdown of Binance and as a consequence the cryptosphere went on red alert. Thousands of Twitter handles began screaming foul and speculating as to whether or not their funds were still sitting safely in Binance wallets.

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The original, and deleted, “funds are safe” tweet.

In response, Binance CEO Changpeng Zhao (CZ) tweeted an explanation claiming “all funds are safe.”  Soon, 4Chan channel /biz/ was exploding with parody and the phrase “Funds are Safu,” was born. In just a few days, Bizonacci cemented ‘Funds are Safu’ as a crypto-meme when he released an animated mockery of the situation on Youtube. 

As usual in, our small corner of the internet, original content began flooding Twitter. The meme was a hit and even CZ himself played along, tweeting “Funds are safu,” during a scheduled upgrade later in the month. Even going so far as to name the Binance insurance fund S.A.F.U.

funds are safu
CZ embracing the “funds are safu” meme.
funds are safu
CZ explaining the history of “funds are safu”

It’s a meme with legs and it’s unlikely to go anywhere anytime soon. Reminding all of us to remain vigilant, use 2FA, and keep our funds safu.

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