ethereum classic

Mining pool, Etherchain, has reported that Ethereum Classic (ETC) has succumbed to a successful 51% attack “with multiple 100+ block reorganization.”

A 51% attack occurs when a malicious actor commands more than half the hashing power on a blockchain. It allows the attackers to “double spend” a cryptocurrency, hence why it’s often known as a “double spend attack.”

“Block reorganization” as mentioned in Etherchain’s tweet, refers to a blockchain which excludes blocks that were initially thought to be part of the longest chain. This is consistent with a double spend attack.

Rumors of a 51% on the ETC blockchain emerged early on January 7th. The Ethereum Classic Twitter account initially dismissed the rumors. However, they have since recognized the attack and advised all exchanges and mining pools to increase confirmation times. 

Ethereum Classic forked from Ethereum after the community’s controversial decision to reverse a hack in 2016.

Block Explorer will update this article as we learn more.

Further reading: What is a 51% Attack?

  • A hard fork occurs when one cryptocurrency (like bitcoin) breaks off to form a new currency (like bitcoin cash).
  • Hard forks take place when the community wants to make a significant upgrade or disagrees on how to move forward.
  • Examples include bitcoin cash, ethereum classic, and bitcoin gold.

Cryptocurrency Hard Forks: Explained

A hard fork is when one cryptocurrency spins off to create another. Think of it like a train track splitting in two. The new coin (and its blockchain) takes a new direction from the old, but they share the same history. It’s a simple fork in the road.

bitcoin hard fork diagram

Let’s take the example of Bitcoin Cash, which is a hard fork of Bitcoin.

In 2017, the Bitcoin community disagreed on how to make improvements to the network. One group wanted to stay true to the old rules and “protocol.” Another group wanted to make drastic changes to how transactions were processed.

Unable to reach an agreement, the second group “forked” off to create a new blockchain. Bitcoin Cash was born.

Bitcoin Cash shares the same blockchain as Bitcoin right up until the moment it forked. From that point onwards, Bitcoin Cash took its own path with its own rules.

bitcoin cash hard fork
Image credit

Bitcoin has forked countless times as the community seeks to improve the technology or disagrees on how to move forward. These forks are not always successful.

How Hard Forks Work

Every blockchain enterprise has its own rules. Those rules dictate how the system works. How large is each block? What rewards do miners get? How are fees calculated? And so forth. One day, the community disagrees on some tidbit, such as whether new code should be introduced or whether participating miners should receive a bonus.

A successful fork is where most of your users agree, collectively make the changes, and move over to the new blockchain. A contentious or experimental fork is where your users split. Some might stick with the present blockchain, some may migrate to the new blockchain, and some use both. Soon you have two versions of your cryptocurrency with different rules.

A failed fork occurs when too few users leap to the new blockchain. That new cryptocurrency quickly becomes worthless.

Hard forks also happen in the following cases:

  • To fix important security risks found in older versions – It took the dollar more than 300 variations to become today’s counterfeit-resilient currency. Blockchain developers aim to make their blockchains 100% breach-free.
  • To add new functionality – Windows 10 is enormously different from its very first version. Blockchain developers upgrade their versions from year to year, adding functions for improvement.
  • To reverse transactions – If website developers suspected a security breach, they could block the previous fork, declaring all previous transactions non-existent. Their new fork would herald a new start.

Hard Forks Can Mean Free Money

The new blockchain is a replica of the old, so all transactions barreling through blockchain A are replicated on blockchain B. If you’ve joined blockchain B, you receive those coins as well as new ones that are mined on your blockchain. Those new coins are known as an airdrop.

crypto airdrops falling

Image credit

When Bitcoin Cash forked, everyone holding bitcoin received the same number of bitcoin cash tokens, essentially for free.

There is a catch, though. You’ll want a secure, private wallet that supports the airdropped coins on the new fork. If you keep your cryptocurrency on an exchange like Coinbase or Binance, the exchange may keep them.

You’ll also want to check whether the forked coin has a future. The unfortunate truth is that most coins fail. Look at the reputation of the fork developers; what are their reviews? Also, see whether credible blockchain services have inspected and credited the open source code of this new coin.

Are Hard Forks a Good Thing?

Some people in the crypto community oppose forks fearing that the new coin will devalue their old. However, a successful fork usually means good news for traders.

When a new fork is announced, we often see a flurry of traders rushing to buy the coin hoping to get free airdrops. That naturally increases the price.

It’s true that the forked coins often become worthless, but some are successful and ultimately valuable, such as bitcoin cash. You’ll often see a profit from a successful airdrop.

Sometimes the hard fork is widely opposed by the majority of people. When that happens, it can strengthen support for the original coin, sending the price up.

Hard Fork Example: Bitcoin Cash

bitcoin cash logo

In August 2017, a group of Bitcoin stakeholders including investors, entrepreneurs, developers, and China-based miners quarreled over the size of the Bitcoin block. Some wanted to keep the one megabyte (MB) limit coded into Bitcoin by Satoshi Nakamoto himself. Others wanted to increase the size to two MB while other stakeholders fretted it should exceed 9,000!

The team eventually split. Bitcoin loyalists adhered to the old protocol, while critics created a new coin called bitcoin cash.

Bitcoin cash never became as popular as the original bitcoin. In December 2017, bitcoin cash was worth $4,355.62. August, 2018, bitcoin cash sold for $519.12. The research firm Chainanalysis noted that in May 2018, the 17 largest payment processing services processed bitcoin cash payments worth US$3.7 million, down from US$10.5 million two months before

To date, Bitcoin’s hard fork iterations include the following:

  • Bitcoin Platinum (BTP). December 1, 2017. A scam, invented by a South Korean teenager in an attempt to kill the price of bitcoin and profit by betting against it.
  • Super Bitcoin (SBTC). December 15, 2017. Among other changes, Super Bitcoin included smart contract functionality, taking a leaf out of the Ethereum blockchain.
  • Bitcoin God (GOD). December 25 2017. Chandler Guo proclaimed Bitcoin God a Christmas gift to bitcoin holders. Most called it bizarre
  • Bitcoin Uranium (BUM). December 31, 2017. BUM was an attempt to democratize Bitcoin, which critics said had become dominated by a small group of entities over-exerting their power over miners. BUM was created as Satoshi’s original vision. It bummed.
  • Bitcoin Cash Plus (BCP). January 2, 2018. Promised “low fees and reliable confirmations”. It flunked almost from the start.

Bitcoin also spawned Bitcoin Diamond (BCD), Bitcoin Gold (BTG), Bitcoin Atom (BCA), Bitcoin Core (BTX), Bitcoin Private (BTCP or ZCL) and Segwit, among others.

Segwit was a soft fork which is quite a different creature.

What is a Soft Fork?

Hard forks are unique in that the changes are incompatible with the previous protocol. Soft forks are different because the software or protocol changes are compatible with the previous versions.

Think of a hard fork being the difference between PlayStation 3 and PlayStation 4. You can’t play PS3 games on PS4 and you can’t play PS4 games on PS3.

A soft fork, on the other hand, is more like Microsoft Excel. You can use MS Excel 2015, even with MS Excel 2005 running in the background. The upgraded version is compatible with the old. At the same time, the updates in the newer version don’t appear in the old. MS Excel 2015 shows features that don’t appear in MS Excel 2005. The new soft fork has additional – or different – features to its older version.

In other words, soft forks have backward compatibility. The new chain contains the previous rules with additions, while the previous blockchain continues unchanged.

segwit soft fork diagram

Image credit: Reddit user u/k06a

As you can see in the diagram, the SegWit fork of Bitcoin is a “soft fork.” It doesn’t create its own blockchain. It simply upgrades and continues the previous chain. In contrast, the hard forks, like Bitcoin Cash and Bitcoin Gold actively split off.

With a hard fork, you need 90 to 95% of the stakeholders, or nodes, to accept your changes for the system to succeed. For a soft fork, you only need a majority of miners to upgrade and agree on the new version.

Soft Fork Example: The SegWit Solution

One of Bitcoin’s greatest frustrations is its slowness. Ten transactions take about a second to slip through compared to Visa’s 5,000-8,000 transactions per second. This is called the “scalability” problem.

In October 2016, Pieter Wuille, a Bitcoin Core developer, tried to treat this problem by modifying the appearance of the Bitcoin block.

Bitcoin blocks have two sections:

  1. The header with its cryptographic data.
  2. The body with transactions and sender/receiver data.

The bulkier the block, the slower traffic.

Wuille divided transactions from sender and receiver data. He gave each their own blocks, creating, in effect, a freeway where bitcoin transactions zoomed through, while so-called witness boxes (SegWit, short for Segregated Witnesses) with scripts and signatures used the parallel lane.

SegWit is called a “soft fork” since it was compatible with Bitcoin’s old code. All Bitcoin needed was 95% of its miners to accept the changes, which happened in less than a year. The platform didn’t need a separate blockchain and currency to make alterations work.

Update:

Critics complained that Segwit fell short of solving Bitcoin’s congestion problems and that the platform needed major changes to decongest its platform. Dissension led to the string of hard forks like the previously mentioned Bitcoin Cash (BCH). In 2017, Bitcoin developers also promoted hard fork SegWit 2x to magnify blocks from 1 MB to 2 MB. That fork died a week before it was scheduled to occur.

Bottom Line

A hard fork:

  • Results in two new blockchains, both of which share the same past.
  • Changes a fundamental aspect of the blockchain or the rules that govern it.
  • Is not compatible with previous versions.

A soft fork:

  • Does not create a new coin or split the blockchain.
  • Upgrades the system with new features that are compatible with the old version.

It’s as simple as that.

Learned something new in this article? Subscribe to our newsletter for more.

GasToken

A group of IC3 developers has released GasToken, an ingenious method to save money on ethereum and ethereum classic transactions — no initial coin offering (ICO) required.

On Thursday, the IC3-backed Chicago Project for the Study of Cryptocommunities released GasToken, a smart contract system that allows users to store gas — a fundamental resource used to make transactions and interact with smart contracts in the Ethereum and Ethereum Classic networks — for later use.

Like all cryptocurrency blockchains, the Ethereum network tends to have peak hours in which users make more transactions, and off hours, when they make less. Unsurprisingly, gas prices tend to run higher during peak hours, as more users compete to have their transactions included in the network’s limited block space.

ICO-related transactions and decentralized applications (Dapps) such as CryptoKitties contribute further to network congestion, making gas prices relatively hard to predict — and often more expensive than users would like.

The GasToken system exploits the “storage refund” feature of Ethereum’s smart contracts scheme. To incentivize contracts to delete storage variables when they are no longer needed, the network issues refunds of up to half of the gas used by a contract transaction whenever a storage element is deleted.

When gas prices are low, users can interact with one of the GasToken smart contracts to mint GasToken tokens (there are two contracts, either of which may be more efficient depending on current network prices).

When gas prices are high, they send their tokens back to the smart contract for destruction, which triggers the storage refund and returns a portion of the now much more valuable gas to the user. This gas can now be used to subsidize a more expensive transaction.

However, there are several things users should keep in mind before they start fracking the network for gas savings.

At present, the system is not incredibly user-friendly, so users will need to do a bit of tinkering to interact with the contracts. This will involve plugging an ABI into an Ethereum or Ethereum Classic contract interface and several other activities that non-programmers may have difficulty performing without assistance.

Additionally, the system’s utility will vary based on network congestion, so the developers created a calculator to help users figure out when it is efficient to use GasToken.

The developers also cautioned that the code has not been independently audited, though they said that it has gone through extensive on-chain testing.

Finally, the developers warned that — because GasToken “exploits a mechanism detail of the non-finalized economic model” of Ethereum, it is very likely that it will be rendered unusable and worthless in a future network update. In other words, GasToken tokens are not an investment — use them, don’t hoard them.

Featured Image from Pixabay