Initial coin offerings (ICOs) are proving to be the investment of the day, with over $9 billion so far raised in the first six months of 2018.

Despite a drop in cryptocurrency prices, interest in ICOs doesn’t appear to be waning. Figures from CoinSchedule indicates that within the first half of the year, more than $9.6 billion has been invested into this form of fundraising. March saw the highest amount raised, coming in at $3.8 billion from 59 ICOs.

When it comes to the top-ranked ICOs, in terms of return on investment (ROI) against the U.S. dollar, which ones make it in the top 10.

The following is in no way an endorsement of ICOs, and potential investors should always conduct their own research before investing their money.

This handy infographic by ico_analysis details what those top 10 ICOs of 2018 are.

Credits

Back in February Credits launched its public crowdsale, hitting its hard cap of $22 million within 17 hours. As an open blockchain platform with smart contracts and an internal cryptocurrency, Credits is reported to have fast transactions up to one million per second and unlimited scalability of the network.

Matrix Chain

The Matrix Chain is also a blockchain platform that supports smart contracts as well as machine learning services. Its public sale launched in mid-January, with a fundraising goal of $12 million. Rated as the next generation blockchain that leverages AI with the blockchain, Owen Tao, CEO of MATRIX, claims it’s a ‘game changer in blockchain technology.’

Switcheo

Built on the NEO blockchain, Switcheo is a decentralized exchange (DEX) that allows for trustless exchange of NEP-5 tokens. It launched its public crowdsale in March with a hard cap of $8 million. It aims to be the first multi-chain DEX for cross-chain token exchange.

Nucleus Vision

Nucleus is an end-to-end technology solution that captures and provides previously inaccessible data to retailers and other ‘brick-and-mortar’ businesses. It achieves this through its proprietary blockchain and real-time sensor technology. In January it reached its hard cap target of $40 million from the backing of prominent blockchain-focused investment companies. It also canceled its public ICO due to rising ethereum prices, deciding instead to list its token directly on exchanges.

Bluzelle

This data service brings together a sharing and token economy. The platform enables people to rent out their unused computer storage space while developers pay to use it with a token. Bluzelle’s token sale ended in January with a target of $19 million.

Zebi

Zebi is a blockchain service that is aiming to become the blockchain network of India. In February, it reached its ICO goal for 30 percent of the token total. It aims to provide individuals, businesses, data requestors, and data providers with a platform to exchange information.

Tomocoin

This is a blockchain infrastructure for the Internet of Value, where people can trade assets, such as stocks, votes, and securities, securely. It will connect to Tomocoin and Ethereum to support cross-chain protocols. Its ICO ended in March with a target of $8 million for 40 percent of token total reached.

Holochain

Holochain is a cloud storage solution provider that is aiming to deliver a decentralized hosting ecosystem. Its token sale ended in April where it had a target of $20 million.

Zilliqa

This is a new blockchain platform that is designed to scale in an open, permissionless distributed network securely. A core feature of it is sharding, which enables it to scale and is a problem it is attempting to solve in the industry. Its public sale was at the beginning of the year with a hard cap of $22 million to raise.

Ontology

Built on the NEO blockchain, Ontology is a network that connects ‘distributed identity verification, data exchange, data collaboration, procedure protocols, communities, attestation, and various industry-specific modules.’ Unlike conventional ICO sales, Ontology didn’t have one, but instead only airdropped to subscribers in March. Distributed by the NEO Council, 20 million ONT tokens were sent to the community.

Featured image from Shutterstock.

hong kong

Hong Kong authorities have said that while they won’t ban the trading of cryptocurrencies, they will educate people on the risks involved instead.

According to the Financial Services and the Treasury Bureau, the public education campaign will highlight that the crypto market is not regulated, is subjected to hacking, and fluctuates in price, reports the South China Morning Post. The campaign is being run together with the Investor Education Centre, a subsidiary of the Securities and Futures Commission.

It’s expected to be rolled out from March via print, digital, and broadcast media in addition to the Mass Transit Railway (MTR) stations, a major public transport network serving Hong Kong.

Joseph Chan Ho-lim, the Treasury’s undersecretary, said that investors in Hong Kong may not know about the risks surrounding cryptocurrencies and initial coin offerings (ICOs).

Julia Leung Fung-yee, executive director of the intermediaries division of the commission, explained by saying:

When we asked some young people why they bought cryptocurrencies, many of them cared less about the projects mentioned in the [ICOs’] White Paper … they just wanted to make quick money by speculating on the cryptocurrency exchange.

Interestingly, while the volatility of the digital currency market remains a concern to policymakers in Hong Kong, that doesn’t mean they’re about to tell investors what they should and shouldn’t invest in.

These comments come at a time when the cryptocurrency market is experiencing heightened attention from traders and authorities concerned about rising prices. At the end of 2017 bitcoin saw its value soar by nearly 2,000 percent before losing half its price at the start of 2018. Speculation that the sector is in a bubble remains; however, this doesn’t appear to have dampened interest in it. Raising funds through ICOs has also increased, which saw crowdsourced fundraising bringing in between $4 billion and $7 billion.

However, unlike Chinese and South Korean authorities, which are cracking down on cryptocurrencies and trading platforms, Hong Kong’s government has indicated that it doesn’t plan to follow suit anytime soon.

One of the measures that authorities have implemented to protect consumers is that ICO issuers are required to follow existing laws and regulations if the coin they are offering falls within the remit of a security or investment.

Yet, according to Leo Weese, chairman of the Hong Kong Bitcoin Association, this is a topic that needs to be talked about.

“We should know the difference between what makes a good ICO [and what doesn’t] and how we differentiate between scams and legitimate projects.”

Featured image from Shutterstock.