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Use our news to inform cryptocurrency trading decisions, stay up-to-date on happenings in the industry, and more!

Wells Fargo Is The Latest Bank To Block Cryptocurrency Purchases On Credit
You can’t buy bitcoin with Wells Fargo credit cards anymore. Engadget reports, “Wells Fargo is pumping the brakes on customers using their credit cards to buy bitcoin — the bank has banned credit card cryptocurrency purchases. However, this isn’t a permanent measure, as Wells Fargo will monitor the crypto market and reassess the issue as needed”.

SEC Launches ICO Portal: Highlights Risks, Rewards, and Responsibilities
According to Tony Spilotro of BlockExplorer, “The United States Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is vehemently opposed to a common crowdfunding practice in the cryptocurrency industry called the initial coin offering (ICO). An ICO is similar to an initial public offering where a company or corporation raises investment capital by offering its stock to the public for the first time. Only in an ICO, a digital currency or token is distributed instead of a stock, and the token can have a variety of uses that blur the line of what defines a traditional security.”

Hackers Steal $20 Million Of Ethereum From Ethereum-based Apps and Mining Rigs
The Chinese cyber-security firm Qihoo 360 Netlab reported hackers stole over $20 million of Ethereum. BleepingComputer tells us, “The cause of these thefts is Ethereum software applications that have been configured to expose an RPC [Remote Procedure Call] interface on port 8545. The purpose of this interface is to provide access to a programmatic API that an approved third-party service or app can query and interact or retrieve data from the original Ethereum-based service —such as a mineror wallet application that users or companies have set up for mining or managing funds.”

Argo Blockchain to List on London Stock Exchange, Launches Subscription Crypto-mining
Argo Blockchain, a business that seeks to offer cryptocurrency-mining to the masses, announced its plans to list its shares on the London Stock Exchange. BlockExplorer’s Julia Travers shares with us that “the announcement coincided with the launch of Argo’s Mining as a Service, or MaaS, program, which will allow users to participate in mining through the Argo site with their home computers or smartphones.”

Bitcoin mining

Argo Blockchain, a business that seeks to offer cryptocurrency-mining to the masses, announced its plans to list its shares on the London Stock Exchange or LSE on June 11, 2018. This announcement coincided with the launch of Argo’s Mining as a Service, or MaaS, program, which will allow users to participate in mining through the Argo site with their home computers or smartphones. According to the announcements, Argo expects its valuation to be £40 million, or about $54 million, and to raise £20 million, or about $27 million. Argo plans to use the money raises to fund the growth if its MaaS services. Co-founder Jonathan Bixby said:

We have launched this service to take the pain and heartache out of participating in the biggest new technology breakthrough since the launch of the internet.

Argo aims to be the first crypto-mining company on the LSE. In 2015, blockchain-focused investment business Coinsilium was the first cryptocurrency-related company to hold an IPO on LSE’s submarket for smaller companies, AIM.

Argo was established in 2017. According to the company announcements, its technology invites the public at large to become crypto-miners, “without the need to have significant computing expertise or acquire complex and expensive hardware and have the frustration of setting up their own systems.”

Argo compares its mainstream mining services to the cloud computing revolution of the last decade, and Bixby told The Financial Times it wants to be “the Amazon web services of crypto.” Subscribers to Argo’s cloud-based platform sign up for a specific amount of mining capacity and can choose what to mine, which mining pool to join and where to store their coins off the site. Introductory fees to join its pools are £18 or about $25 per month. Currently, it mines the digital currencies Bitcoin Gold, Ethereum, Ethereum Classic and Zcash, but this may change in the future.

Argo is headquartered in London and has a mining facility in Quebec. It currently has 7 racks, each holding 10 servers with 8 GPUs each in Canada, and it has also started “initial operations” in China. Argo’s primary targets customers are in Europe, North America and Australia. The company plans to rely on renewable energy like solar and hydropower.

Bixby describes the company’s plan to go public in this way:

A London stock market listing will provide Argo with the profile, credibility and access to global capital to drive our growth and help us establish a leadership position in the long term.

The featured image is the Argo logo, credit: Argo.

Reddit and GitHub user iminehard noticed their cellphone experienced interference while near their impressive GPU mining farm. Following this, iminehard investigated the issue and found that there was a definite increase in noise around a specific LTE range. iminehard’s testing methodology and results are covered in more detail below.

“TL;DR – Large number of GPUs in open air crypto currency mining “rigs” emit substantial spurious emissions/noise on portions of the LTE spectrum used in the United States.”-GitHub and Reddit user iminehard

Testing for interference

iminehard documented their testing methodology along with their results. Testing made use of a Laptop, an RTL-SDL tuner, and an omnidirectional antenna for said tuner. SDL, or Software Defined Radio, allows you to use a computer to capture and produce RF signals, using its CPU to process the signals. This is different from regular radio, which uses specialized hardware to process the signal. Iminehard used this to capture the frequencies on which LTE operates.

Chart comparing parts of the RF spectrum between tests
Mining in blue, idle in green

The first pair of tests iminehard performed was a single GPU inside a case, first at idle, but overclocked and with fans on, and the second with the mining software bminer running. No perceptible difference can be seen on the charts comparing the LTE spectrum between the two tests. The lack of difference between the charts could mean a few things. Namely, it could mean that the case used blocked or grounded out the interference. Otherwise, it could mean that the interference generated by a single GPU is undetectably negligible.

Moving forward, iminehard tested their mining farm, with interesting results:

 

iminehard's GPU mining farm
iminehard’s GPU mining farm

iminehard used the same testing method that was used above on their farm. And unlike the previous test, there was a significant change in what iminehard called “range 1” of the LTE spectrum used by the United States (617-746 MHz).

Chart of RF spectrum showing the difference between tests
Mining in blue, idle in green. Sourced from iminehard’s investigation on GitHub

Results of interference

As shown above, there is some definite interference caused by large-scale GPU farms. This interference may cause service disruptions for those trying to use cell phones within the field. Due to the fact that this may cause service interruption, the farms may break federal laws regarding intentional interference. Or may cause the FCC to come knocking on your door asking you to knock it off.

Shielding to prevent interference

The above tests were performed on ‘open’ GPUs. ‘Open’ referring to the fact that the GPUs were not mounted in a metal case. A metal case may provide some shielding for the interference that the GPUs release, either due to grounding or construction. Aside from being sure to mount all GPUs in a real case, one could build a Faraday cage around the entire farm. A correctly built faraday cage should contain all the interference within the cage. One major downside to using a Faraday cage is that Faraday cages are conductive. If it collapses, it could damage equipment.

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Use our news to inform cryptocurrency trading decisions, stay up-to-date on happenings in the industry, and more!

Bitcoin Price Could Be In For A Boost As World Cup Fans Descend On Russia
Hotels in the Russia city of Kaliningrad — which will be playing host to some of the World Cup’s games — are accepting Bitcoin as payment. Forbes reports some airlines and travel agents, as well as bars will also be taking the cryptocurrency.

Bittrex Strikes Agreement With Bank To Offer USD Deposits and Trading Pairs
BlockExplorer’s own Tony Spilotro reports “The Seattle-based cryptocurrency exchange Bittrex has revealed that the firm has struck an agreement with a United States bank to allow some of its customers to trade cryptocurrencies in USD, along with making USD deposits to the exchange’s wallets.”

The Humanitarian Side of Bitcoin
International Policy Digest has a thoughtful piece on how Bitcoin can help a socioeconomic crisis such as the one in Venezuela, a country actually going out of their way to ban Bitcoin. “Bitcoin, Blockchain and the whole host of other cryptocurrencies and related media have a real shot at not simply being the ‘next big thing’ as their acolytes incessantly seem to preach. They actually can help change lives for the better through circumventing oppressive state bureaucracies and structures in inspired acts of cryptocurrency-based agorism.”

Litecoin Founder Charlie Lee: LTC Network Extremely Secure, Mining Healthy
CryptoSlate says “Litecoin founder Charlie Lee has taken to Twitter to address community concerns regarding the Litecoin network sparked by a cryptocurrency security site that tracks the cost of launching a 51% attack against proof of work cryptocurrencies.”

Image courtesy of Carty Sewill, http://cartyisme.com/

Despite the Venezuelan government embracing cryptocurrency with open arms – even launching their own oil-backed Petro cryptocurrency in an effort to solve the country’s economic crisis – according to a new report from local Venezuelan media, the country has taken a stand against cryptocurrency mining, outright banning related computer equipment from entering the country.

The report states that the Venezuelan government made a policy change at the end of April that restricts computer equipment such as GPUs or ASIC miners. Customs authorities have been seizing related devices received by air and sea since the change went into effect.

Shipping companies such as Liberty Express and DHL, who ship these mining devices to Venezuela on behalf of their customers, have either updated their pages on restricted products entering Venezuela to include mining equipment or have sent out notices to their customers notifying them of the changes to avoid any inconveniences they may experience as a result of the policy change.

The policy change has already gone into effect, but only on a temporary basis until officials from the National Association of Cryptocurrencies meet with the Superintendence of Cryptoactives and Related Venezuelan Activities to address the issue next week.

Weeks ago, Superintendent Carlos Vargas indicated that the country was evaluating authorizing companies to import digital mining equipment to sell in Venezuela:

“We are in an evaluation process to select and authorize companies that are qualified to import and market digital mining equipment and be responsible for the respective guarantees in our country.”

Vargas warned individuals mining cryptocurrency to be “prudent at the moment of acquiring the equipment since until now no company has been endorsed or certified,” by Venezuelan regulators.

Considering Vargas’ statement, the ban appears to be temporary until the government finalizes authorizing company’s to begin importing mining equipment for resale in Venezuela.