Motivations for a Bitcoin ETF

As Bitcoin matures into a viable asset class investors demand easier ways to join the burgeoning market. Apart from retail interest, institutions have billions of dollars on the sidelines patiently waiting to enter the market.

The S-1 filing describes shares of the ETF to be “Easily Accessible and Cost Efficient.”  The Winklevoss Bitcoin Trust will allow investors to avoid the process of purchasing bitcoins on exchanges and having to handle security and storage. Shares would trade just like stocks, allowing mainstream investors to enter the market through an existing broker easily.

SEC Ruling: Winklevoss’ ETF Denied

Recently, the SEC denied The Winklevoss’ Bats BZX Exchange, Inc. (BZX) second ETF proposal. The Commission was careful to emphasize that the decision denying a Bitcoin ETF does not rest on evaluating whether or not bitcoin has inherent value.

Manipulation Still a Primary Concern

The SEC has yet to approve a digital currency-based ETF. In the latest decision, the SEC noted that more than 75% of the volume of bitcoin trading occurs outside the U.S., with only 5% of trading taking place on U.S. exchanges. Many overseas exchanges are unregulated, making markets susceptible to illegal market manipulation strategies such as wash trading.

SEC Commissioner Dissents

According to Commissioner Hester Peirce, the disapproval order focuses on the characteristics of the spot market for bitcoin, rather than on the ability of BZX to surveil trading of and to deter manipulation in their listed shares. Peirce noted if the disapproval order’s rigorous standard were applied consistently, many commodity-based ETFs would not pass.

Approval of this order would demonstrate the SEC’s commitment to acting within the scope of their limited role in regulating the securities markets. The disapproval denies investors from accessing Bitcoin through a predictable, transparent, and simplified product.

 100% Chance of a Bitcoin ETF

 The Winklevoss twins aren’t alone in the Bitcoin ETF space. On July 24th, the SEC delayed its decision on a separate Bitcoin ETF application from investment firm Direxion. Bitwise also filed its own application that would track an index of ten cryptocurrencies.

Jan van Eck, CEO of VanEck Associates is 100% certain the SEC will pass a Bitcoin ETF in the long run. The VanEck, Cboe, and SolidX partnership currently awaits SEC ruling on their proposed Bitcoin ETF. VanEck is hopeful of gaining approval addressing the SEC’s concerns here. Mark your calendars — the ruling is expected to occur between August 10th and 16th.

Conclusion

The disapproval order unintentionally undermines investor protection, precluding investors from benefiting from the increased institutional discipline that comes with approval. Bitcoin markets are steadily maturing, and mainstream finance is knocking at the door. Mass adoption is so close yet so far.

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Wells Fargo Is The Latest Bank To Block Cryptocurrency Purchases On Credit
You can’t buy bitcoin with Wells Fargo credit cards anymore. Engadget reports, “Wells Fargo is pumping the brakes on customers using their credit cards to buy bitcoin — the bank has banned credit card cryptocurrency purchases. However, this isn’t a permanent measure, as Wells Fargo will monitor the crypto market and reassess the issue as needed”.

SEC Launches ICO Portal: Highlights Risks, Rewards, and Responsibilities
According to Tony Spilotro of BlockExplorer, “The United States Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is vehemently opposed to a common crowdfunding practice in the cryptocurrency industry called the initial coin offering (ICO). An ICO is similar to an initial public offering where a company or corporation raises investment capital by offering its stock to the public for the first time. Only in an ICO, a digital currency or token is distributed instead of a stock, and the token can have a variety of uses that blur the line of what defines a traditional security.”

Hackers Steal $20 Million Of Ethereum From Ethereum-based Apps and Mining Rigs
The Chinese cyber-security firm Qihoo 360 Netlab reported hackers stole over $20 million of Ethereum. BleepingComputer tells us, “The cause of these thefts is Ethereum software applications that have been configured to expose an RPC [Remote Procedure Call] interface on port 8545. The purpose of this interface is to provide access to a programmatic API that an approved third-party service or app can query and interact or retrieve data from the original Ethereum-based service —such as a mineror wallet application that users or companies have set up for mining or managing funds.”

Argo Blockchain to List on London Stock Exchange, Launches Subscription Crypto-mining
Argo Blockchain, a business that seeks to offer cryptocurrency-mining to the masses, announced its plans to list its shares on the London Stock Exchange. BlockExplorer’s Julia Travers shares with us that “the announcement coincided with the launch of Argo’s Mining as a Service, or MaaS, program, which will allow users to participate in mining through the Argo site with their home computers or smartphones.”

The United States Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is vehemently opposed to a common crowdfunding practice in the cryptocurrency industry called the initial coin offering (ICO). An ICO is similar to an initial public offering where a company or corporation raises investment capital by offering its stock to the public for the first time. Only in an ICO, a digital currency or token is distributed instead of a stock, and the token can have a variety of uses that blur the line of what defines a traditional security.

Still, the SEC believes that the way ICOs are funded has them falling under security laws, and the companies interested in launching an initial coin offering need to comply with SEC private placement rules and investor protection guidelines. Those that fail to comply, may be subject to cease and desist letters in the future, as has happened with a number of US-based ICOs.

To further warn potential investors of the dangers initial coin offerings, the SEC has published a website on the increasingly popular capital raising method, providing what the SEC calls the “three ‘Rs’ of ICOs: Risks Rewards and Responsibilities.”

The website reads:

“Companies and individuals are increasingly considering initial coin offerings (ICOs) as a way to raise capital or participate in investment opportunities. While these digital assets and the technology behind them may present a new and efficient means for carrying out financial transactions, they also bring increased risk of fraud and manipulation because the markets for these assets are less regulated than traditional capital markets.’

The list of potential risks, rewards, and responsibilities is directed both at investors and potential ICO issuers and cover off on how initial coin offerings could be securities, may need to be registered with the SEC, or may pose “substantial risks.” To avoid those risks, the SEC warns investors to do their own research, ask questions, to understand the product, and to take extreme caution if and when an investment sounds “too good to be true.”

The SEC also takes the opportunity to warn would-be ICO issuers, asking them to “use caution before promoting offers and selling coins.”

A month ago, the SEC launched a fake ICO website called HoweyCoins.com to provide a working example of what a fraudulent ICO may look like. Investors who clicked on any of the fake site’s ‘buy now’ buttons, were redirected to educational materials on what red flags to look out for when considering investing in an ICO.

[Image Credit: WikiMedia Commons]

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Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey: Bitcoin Should Be Native Currency of the Internet
Twitter and Square CEO Jack Dorsey stood on stage at the Consensus conference, saying Bitcoin should be the cryptocurrency of the internet.

Adware Bundle Makes Chrome Invisible to Launch Cryptojacking Attacks
ZDNet reports, “CPU usage spikes up to 80 percent on infected machines.”

The SEC Launches Phony ICO Site to Promote Scam Awareness
In a bid to raise awareness of potential investment scams in the cryptocurrency space, BlockExplorer’s Tony Spilotro says the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s (SEC) Office of Investor Education and Advocacy have launched a fake website posing as a luxury travel firm kicking off the pre-sale portion of their initial coin offering (ICO).

Largest Bank in the Philippines Showcases Bitcoin Mining Equipment
The cryptocurrency world is buzzing upon the news The Philippines largest bank is dabbling in Bitcoin. NewsBTC reports, “UnionBank recently demonstrated its cryptocurrency miners at a business conference. That is an interesting development, considering how the world’s leading cryptocurrency is a legal tender in the country.”

PwC China Survey Finds That Most Companies Prefer to Investigate Blockchain Internally
Rebecca Campbell of BlockExplorer reports, “A joint survey by PwC and VeChain has found that most enterprises prefer to setup their own in-house research and development (R&D) teams to investigate the blockchain.”

Image courtesy of Carty Sewill, http://cartyisme.com/

In a bid to raise awareness of potential investment scams in the cryptocurrency space, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s (SEC) Office of Investor Education and Advocacy have launched a fake website posing as a luxury travel firm kicking off the pre-sale portion of their initial coin offering (ICO).

The website HoweyCoins.com, is a tongue-in-cheek play on everything your run-of-the-mill bogus ICO offers. From ‘too-good-to-be-true’ promises, to flashy images of champagne bottles and palm trees, to convoluted and often-plagiarized whitepapers, to pre-sale bonus countdown clocks, the SEC’s spoof site has got all of the common enticements found on fraudulent sites.

In a press release titled “The SEC Has an Opportunity you Wont Want to Miss: Act Now!” SEC Chairman Jay Clayton explained the motivation behind HoweyCoins:

“The rapid growth of the ‘ICO’ market, and its widespread promotion as a new investment opportunity, has provided fertile ground for bad actors to take advantage of our Main Street investors,” with Clayton adding:

“We embrace new technologies, but we also want investors to see what fraud looks like, so we built this educational site with many of the classic warning signs of fraud. Distributed ledger technology can add efficiency to the capital raising process, but promoters and issuers need to make sure they follow the securities laws. I encourage investors to do their diligence and ask questions.”

Anyone who clicks on the “Buy Coins Now!” Button will be redirected to educational materials from the SEC warning users of potentials scams and what red flags to look out for. Some of the red flags outlined include celebrity endorsements, claims of guaranteed returns, claims of SEC-compliance, and more.

Even the site name HoweyCoins is an Easter egg referencing the “Howey test” – a test created by the Supreme Court stemming from the SEC v. W.J. Howey Co. case in 1946, aimed at determining whether a financial transaction qualifies as an “investment contract.”

Who knew the SEC was this funny? Still, fraudulent investments are no laughing matter, and the SEC has done a solid job at raising awareness of the potential pitfalls of cryptocurrency investing, all while serving as an entertaining break from the daily grind.

For educational information on how investors can protect themselves, visit investor.gov or use the Buy Coins Now button on HoweyCoins.com.